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Math 1552: Information for Students

Math 1552 - Section 10 - For Spring 2017



Time 12:30-01:20 PM, TWThF.
Location 0112 Lockett Hall
Calendar Our class meets from Wednesday, January 11, 2017 through Friday, April 28, 2017. The Final Exam will be Tuesday May 2, 12:30 - 2:30PM..
Leonard Richardson Office 386 Lockett
Office Hours MWThF 1:30pm–2:20pm; Tuesday 2:30--3:30. I am available at many other times. Call or email first to make sure I'm able meet with you. I answer email many times daily---usually quickly.
Telephone 578--1568
E-Mail rich@math.lsu.edu
Textbook Homework will be assigned daily based on the progress that day in class. The text book is Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th edition, by James Stewart. Please make sure you have the correct edition (8!!) of this text since assignments will be from this book We will not be using WebAssign for homework. However, please note: Some students may have WebAssign access already from Math 1550 and may wish to continue using the e-book version of the text. This is still available to you. Just sign up on WebAssign for Math 1552-Section 10 with Leonard Richardson as instructor using the class key code lsu 0122 0357.
Free Math tutoring: The math tutorial in the Shell Center of the library is open from 9:30 AM to 7:00 PM Monday -Thursday, and Friday from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM. This is free math tutoring.
Syllabus Chapters 7, 10--14.3 in the Stewart text, 8th edition. This course is a four (4) hour course designed for math, science and engineering majors and certain other technical majors. It satisfies four hours of the General Education Analytical Reasoning requirement. This course is a General Education course in the analytical reasoning area because it includes the following area learning objective: LSU graduates will employ scientific and mathematical models in the resolution of laboratory and real-world problems." As a 4-credit course, students are expected to have eight (8) hours of coursework outside of class per week, for a minimum time commitment of 12 hours per week.

Topics Covered: A partial list of basic skills you should acquire during the course.

Techniques of Integration

Approximate integrals using numerical integration
Evaluate integrals using integration by parts
Evaluate integrals of trigonometric forms
Evaluate integrals by trigonometric substitution
Evaluate integrals by the method of partial fractions
Evaluate Improper Integrals

Infinite Series

Analysis of sequences and their convergence
Use the definition of convergence for series
Use the integral test, the comparison tests, the ratio test and the root test
Determine power series and their intervals of convergence
Form Taylor series for common functions and master simple applications of Taylor series

Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates and Conic Sections

Draw parametric curves and calculate derivatives along parametric curves
Calculate arc length and speed along parametric curves
Draw polar curves and convert between rectangular and polar forms
Calculate arc length and areas using polar coordinates
Sketch conic sections and write the equations of conic sections

Vectors

Be able to draw two dimensional vectors and do simple arithmetic on vectors
Be versant with three space and three space vectors
Be able to calculate dot products, the angle between vectors and vector projections
Calculate cross products and know the geometric interpretations of cross products
Be able to write equations of planes meeting the usual conditions
Calculus of Vector Valued Functions
Recognize and sketch simple vector valued functions
Compute limits and derivatives of vector valued functions
Calculate arc length and speed for vector valued functions
Calculate curvature, the unit normal and the osculating circle for simple parameterizations
Work with uniform circular motion and ballistic motion

Partial Derivatives

Be able to compute partial derivatives of simple functions
Understand Clairault's Theorem

Prerequisites MATH 1550 or MATH 1551. The student is assumed to be capable in the standard Calculus I topics of taking limits, continuity, taking derivatives of fairly complicated functions, using derivatives, calculating the definite integral for basic functions, integration by substitution and the standard applications of the definite integral. Students who are not fully prepared for this course should review the chain rule, the basic integral formulas and integration by substitution, trigonometric equations and polar coordinates.

Organization of this Class

Please understand that it is from the effort of working your way through assigned problems on paper that you learn mathematics. It is by no means sufficient to read solutions in a solutions manual! Although I hope you benefit from seeing solutions presented in class, you must not expect to learn how to solve problems just from watching. You must work out problems yourself, the hard way, in order to learn this work. Examination problems will be very similar to assigned homework problems. Thus your daily effort on homework problems will be strongly reflected in your test grades. It is very important that you maintain a notebook with all your homework problems worked out fully by yourself. If you email me about a pending assignment, I may send a hint to the whole class in answer to your question, not giving your name of course!
It is very important to come to class every day from the first class of the semester to the last day, and to do all the assignments on time to the best of your ability. Lax attendance or laxity in doing the homework are two of the earliest warning signs of academic failure. Please arrive on time for class. However, anyone may need to be late on some days for reasons beyond your control---such as transportation breakdown or a preceding class running overtime. If you need to be late, please do not wait outside in the hall. Please come in right away, late or not, and take a seat. You should not miss any more class time than necessary and no apology is needed for being late. Just come in right away.

Tests

There will be 4 in-class closed-book hour tests (100 points each) and a two hour final examination (200 points). No cell phones, computers, or internet devices allowed during hour tests or the final exam. You must keep your eyes on your own paper and do your own work. Do not communicate with your classmates during an examination. No books or notes are permitted, electronic, paper, or on any other medium. No electronic devices are permitted on tests other than a scientific calculator (with no symbolic calculations or graphing capability) and a watch to check the time. No cell phones, smart phones, or internet-connected devices are permitted during tests. The problems will be similar to those in the homework. All tests will all be graded by me and there will be partial credit, since the work is at least as important as the answer.

Absences

If you miss a test, it is your responsibility to speak to me as soon as possible to determine whether or not your excuse is acceptable. Here is some General Guidance regarding appropriate reasons for absence from a test or examination. If you are in doubt, ask me as soon as possible. However, please note that leaving early for a holiday, making plane reservations to leave early while classes or examinations are scheduled by the University, or planning to attend a social event during University scheduled class times is not a legitimate excuse for missing a test.

Grades

There will be four in-class hour tests, worth 100 points each. One half your final exam grade (which has a 200 point maximum score) will replace your lowest hour test grade if there is an hour test grade lower than one half your final exam grade. But beware: The final exam will be comprehensive so please do your best to prepare for each hour test! T I will grade your hour tests and return them to you the very next class meeting each time. Your final average will be the sum of all your test grades divided by 6. So your final test average will be less than or equal to 100. The minimum grade for each letter grade is as follows:
A+, 97
A, 93
A-, 90
B+,87
B, 83
B-, 80
C+, 77
C, 73
C-, 70
D+, 67
D, 63
D-, 60
F, below 60
You should save all your graded work for future study and in case you think your final grade is in error.

Unhappy with your grades in Math?

Click here for a Plan to improve your grades!

Remarks

It is especially important not to fall behind. It is very important to attend class and to ask questions. Please do not assume you can take care of difficulties later---see me for help as soon as possible if there is something you do not understand! You are responsible for all assigned problems---not just those which we go over in class!

It is not possible to anticipate each student's difficulties so you need to bring them to my attention.

Calculators, Collaboration, and Computer Support

You can use any technology available to help with homework, and you may collaborate with others while doing homework, provided that you maintain a notebook with your own handwritten solutions of each homework problem. However, on in-class exams you may only use a scientific calculator that does not do graphing or symbolic manipulation, such as solving equations and symbolically calculating derivatives and integrals. Also, work on in-class exams must be your own work with no assistance from anyone else. During an exam, attempts to look at other students' exams and the use of crib sheets or formula sheets will be considered to be a violation of the LSU Code of Student Conduct and will be reported to the Student Advocacy and Accountability Office.

The full power of Mathematica is available on many LSU computers, including those in the Math Department's computer labs and in the Library as well. Students can access Mathematica on Tigerware through their MYLSU accounts.
There is a simplified Web Mathematica which is free to use online if you click on the link in this sentence. If you have not already had the Math Department's course in Mathematica, you might find it simpler to figure out how to use the Web Mathematica. However, it is not as versatile as the full version. But do remember, this is an auxiliary resource. The time you spend working on problems on paper is the most important part of homework when it comes to learning the subject. With that understanding, Mathematica can be fun and helpful too.

Assignment and Test Calendar


The Assignment and Test Calendar in the table below will be updated regularly as the semester proceeds. Be sure to reload this page from the website each time you visit, since it is updated as the semester proceeds!



Due Dates Assignments and Test Dates
January 12 7.1 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15.
January 13 7.1 / 17, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 33, 39, 41, 57, 61
January 17 7.2 / 7, 9, 11.
January 18 7.2 / 1, 3, 5, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 27, 31, 33, 45, 49.
January 19 7.2 / 41, 43.
January 20 7.3 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 23, 27, 29.
January 25 7.4 / 1a, 5a, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17.
January 26 7.4 / 1b, 3, 5b, 19, 21, 23, 29, 31, 39.
January 27 7.5 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 31, 41, 45, 57, 71.
January 31 7.8 / 1, 5, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, 25, 27, 37.
February 1--2 Bring Questions to Review for Hour Test #1 Especially bring questions from the homework assignments, But be sure to bring copies of the actual questions so I can help in class.
February 3 Hour Test #1 today, covering section 7.1 -- 7.5 and 7.8.
February 4 Please download First Hour Test with solutions and class statistics at the end
February 8 10.1 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21.
February 9 10.2 / 1, 3, 5, 17, 19, 29.
February 10 10.2 / 11, 13, 15, 25, 31, 33.
February 14 10.2 / 41, 43, 61.
February 15 10.3 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 29, 31, 33, 35.
February 16 10.3 / 55, 57, 63, 65; 10.4 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 19, 27, 33, 37.
February 17 10.4 / 45, 47.
February 21 10.5 / 1, 3, 5, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21, 25, 27.
February 22 10.6 / 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15.
February 23 Bring Questions to Review for Hour Test #2 Especially bring questions from the homework assignments, from 10. -- 10.6.
February 24 Hour Test #2 today, covering the assignments from 10.1---10.6.
February 26 Please download Spring 2017 Test #2 with Solutions and overall class Statistics at the end.
March 2 11.1 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 23, 25. 27, 29, 31, 33, 37, 41, 43, 45.
March 3 11.2 / 17--25 odd, 31, 35, 51, 57, 59, 61.
March 7 11.2 / 15, 27, 29, 43, 45. (Read about telescoping sums.)
March 8 11.3 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 17, 21, 23, 27, 29.
March 9 11.4 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 19, 21, 23, 27, 29, 31.
March 10 11.5 / 1--17 odd.
March 14 11.6 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 23.
March 15 11.6 / 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35; 11.7 / 1 -- 27(odd).
March 17 11.8 / 3--21 ODD
March 21 11.9 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 15, 25, 41.
March 22 11.10 / 1 -- 15 (odd), 21, 23, 25, 35, 37, 45, 47, 55, 61.
March 23 Bring questions to review for the third hour test.
March 24 Hour Test #3 today, covering assignments that were due since the second hour test.
March 25 Please download Spring 2017 Test #3 with Solutions and overall class Statistics at the end.
March 29 12.1 / 1 -- 41 (odd)
March 30 12.2 / 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 41, 43.
March 31 12.3 / 1 -- 19 (odd), 23, 25, 27, 31.
April 4 12.3 / 33 -- 49 (odd).
April 5 12.4 / 1 -- 17 (odd).
April 6 12.4 / 19, 21, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43.
April 7 12.5 / 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 41, 43, 45, 51.
April 18 13.1 / 1, 3, 7, 17, 19, 27, 31, 43, 45, 49.
April 19 13.2 / 3--29 odd, 35, 37, 51, 53.
April 20 Bring review questions to study for Hour Test #4, covering all assignments since the third hour test. Emphasize sections 12.3--12.5 and 13.1--13.2.
April 21 Hour Test #4 today, covering all assignments since the third hour test.
April 23 Please download Spring 2017 Test #4 with Solutions and overall class Statistics at the end.
April 25 13.3 / 1, 3, 5, 11, 17, 19.
April 26 13.4 / 9, 11, 13, 15, 17(a), 19, 21, 23, 25.
April 27-28 Bring questions to review for the final exam. Bring a #2 pencil on Friday to fill out College of Science Teaching Evaluation.
Study for the Final Exam! This 200-point exam will cover the whole course in a uniform manner, so remember to review from the beginning of the course. Your final grade for the course will be the larger of the following two:
1. The grade guaranteed by the formula provided higher on this page.
2. One letter below the final exam grade. For example, if your final exam grade is A-, you are guaranteed at least a B- in the course.
Thus the final exam provides a safety net that supplements the calculations specified above.
May 1 Office Hours 1:30 PM -- 4:30 PM
Tuesday May 2, 12:30 - 2:30 PM. Final Exam in room 112 Lockett Hall
May 6 Please download Spring 2017 Final Examination with Solutions and overall class Statistics at the end.