LSU College of Science
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Calendar


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Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted March 30, 2007
Last modified April 7, 2007

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Room 130, Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Richard Kadison, University of Pennsylvania Member of the National Academy of Sciences
The Pythagorean Theorem: A Closer Look

Extensions and variants of the Pythagorean theorem are presented, first from the point of view of finite-dimensional, linear algebra and, later, in the framework of infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. The results discussed make contact with the work of Kostant, Atiyah, and Guillemin-Sternberg in the convex geometry of symmetric spaces, the work of Horn and Schur on spectral theory, matrix inequalities, majorization, and convex polytopes, and semi-commutative, metric geometry from the point of view of conditional expectations. The first of the two Pythagoras lectures will be relatively elementary, the second will be slightly more advanced, relying somewhat on the operator-algebra, survey lecture that follows the first lecture. There will be coffee and cookies in the Atrium, Howe-Russell E, at 3:00.

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted March 30, 2007
Last modified April 7, 2007

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm 130 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex.

Richard Kadison, University of Pennsylvania Member of the National Academy of Sciences
Operator Algebras: A Sampler

There will be coffee and cookies in the Atrium, Howe-Russell E, at 3:00.

Thursday, April 12, 2007

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted March 30, 2007
Last modified April 7, 2007

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm 130 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Richard Kadison, University of Pennsylvania Member of the National Academy of Sciences
The Pythagorean Theorem: An Advanced View

There will be coffee and cookies in the Atrium, Howe-Russell E, at 3:00.

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted January 25, 2008
Last modified February 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Howe-Russell E 130

Don Zagier, Max Planck Institut, Bonn and College de France Recipient of the Frank Nelson Cole Prize in Number theory, the Prix Elie Cartan of the Académie des Sciences and the Chauvenet Prize of the Mathematical Association of America
The "q" in "q-series"

There will be refreshments before the lecture at 3pm in the Howe-Russell Atrium.

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted January 25, 2008
Last modified February 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Howe-Russell E 130

Don Zagier, Max Planck Institut, Bonn and College de France Recipient of the Frank Nelson Cole Prize in Number theory, the Prix Elie Cartan of the Académie des Sciences and the Chauvenet Prize of the Mathematical Association of America
The "q" in "quadratic"

There will be refreshments before the lecture at 3pm in the Howe-Russell Atrium.

Friday, April 25, 2008

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted January 25, 2008
Last modified February 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Howe-Russell E 134 (note the room change)

Don Zagier, Max Planck Institut, Bonn and College de France Recipient of the Frank Nelson Cole Prize in Number theory, the Prix Elie Cartan of the Académie des Sciences and the Chauvenet Prize of the Mathematical Association of America
The "q" in "quantum"

There will be refreshments before the lecture at 3pm in the Howe-Russell Atrium.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted October 14, 2010
Last modified February 17, 2011

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm 103 Design Auditorium

Craig Evans, University of California, Berkeley
Linearity and linearization

Abstract: In this expository lecture aimed at a general audience, I will first discuss the profound advantages of linear structure in mathematical problems and then survey several interesting ways to "linearize" nonlinear problems, primarily differential equations. Examples and applications will include perturbation and implicit function procedures, blow-up techniques, kinetic formulations, and adjoint methods based upon formal linearization.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted February 17, 2011

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm 103 Design Auditorium

Craig Evans, University of California, Berkeley
Convexity as one-sided linearity

Abstract: I will continue the themes of the previous talk, surveying for differential equations various convexity methods that can be interpreted as "one-sided linearity" tricks. These are especially useful since, as I will show, several important and highly nonlinear problems possess "hidden" convex structures of various sorts.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted February 17, 2011

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm 103 Design Auditorium

Craig Evans, University of California, Berkeley
Linear adjoint methods for sup-norm variational problems

Abstract: This final lecture will present some technical details about a recent application of linearization and adjoint methods for proving differentiability for weak solutions of the so-called "infinity Laplacian" PDE. This highly degenerate and nonlinear equation is fundamental in the emerging field of sup-norm variational problems and their applications.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted October 2, 2012
Last modified April 3, 2013

4:30 pm - 5:20 pm Design Building, Room 103

S. R. S. Varadhan, Courant Institute National Medal of Science (2010), Abel Prize (2007)
What is large deviations?

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted October 2, 2012
Last modified April 3, 2013

4:30 pm - 5:20 pm Design Building, Room 103

S. R. S. Varadhan, Courant Institute National Medal of Science (2010), Abel Prize (2007)
Scaling limits of large systems

Friday, April 19, 2013

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted October 2, 2012
Last modified April 3, 2013

4:30 pm - 5:20 pm Design Building, Room 103

S. R. S. Varadhan, Courant Institute National Medal of Science (2010), Abel Prize (2007)
Counting Graphs

Monday, April 28, 2014

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted March 12, 2014
Last modified April 25, 2014

3:30 pm - 5:30 pm Digital Media Center "Theatre" (Lecture Hall)

Susan Murphy, University of Michigan H.E. Robbins Professor of Statistics & Professor of Psychiatry, Research Professor, Institute for Social Research 2013 MacArthur Fellow
L 1: Getting SMART about Adapting Interventions L2: Adaptive Confidence Intervals for Non-smooth Parameters

Refreshments at 3pm in foyer by Digital Media Center Lecture Hall

Lecture 1 for General Audience (3:30-4:20)


Getting SMART about Adapting Interventions


Abstract: Imagine you are a child with ADHD. Wouldn't you like your

doctors to periodically adapt your treatment to your unique--and

ever-changing--condition? And wouldn't you be excited to learn that an

algorithm used to analyze your medical data was originally developed for

applications in robotics and artificial intelligence? This lecture will

explain how a randomized clinical trial design (Sequential Multiple

Assignment Randomized Trial or SMART) is being used to develop adaptive

interventions--protocols that systematize sequential decision-making that

is key to effective treatment of health problems. Examples include a

study of children with ADHD and an ongoing study to improve care at

mental health clinics.



Lecture 2 for more specialized audience (4:30-5:20)


Adaptive Confidence Intervals for Non-smooth Parameters


Abstract: Non-regular, aka "non-smooth" parameters are of scientific

interest occur frequently in modern day inference. In particular when

scientific

interest centers on a non-smooth function of regular parameters such as in

the assessment of a machine learning classifier's performance, in the

estimation of multistage decision making policies and in the use of

methods that use assumptions of sparsity to threshold estimators. If

confidence intervals are

considered at all, most research assumes potentially implausible

"margin-like" conditions in order to justify the proposed confidence

interval method. We describe a different approach based on

constructing smooth upper and lower bounds on the parameter and then

basing the confidence interval on the smooth upper and lower bounds.

In particular two settings will be discussed and contrasted, that of a

confidence interval for the mis-classification rate and a confidence

interval for a parameter in multistage decision making policies.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted June 26, 2015
Last modified March 17, 2016

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm DMC Theatre

Maria Chudnovsky, Princeton University MacArthur Foundation Fellowship recipient 2012.
Perfection and Beyond

About 10 years ago one of the central open problems in graph theory at the time, the Strong Perfect Graph Conjecture, was solved. The proof used structural graph theory methods, and spanned 155 journal pages. The speaker was part of the team of authors of this mathematical beast. In this talk we will explain the problem, describe some of the ideas of the proof (that has since been shortened somewhat), and discuss related problems that have been a subject of more recent research.

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted January 22, 2016
Last modified March 17, 2016

10:30 am - 11:20 am DMC Theatre

Maria Chudnovsky, Princeton University MacArthur Foundation Fellowship recipient 2012.
Coloring some perfect graphs

Perfect graphs are a class of graphs that behave particularly
well with respect to coloring. In the 1960's Claude Berge made two
conjectures about this class of graphs, that motivated a great deal of
research, and by now they have both been solved.

The following remained open however: design a combinatorial algorithm that
produces an optimal coloring of a perfect graph. Recently, we were able to
make progress on this question, and we will discuss it in this talk. Last
year, in joint work with Lo, Maffray, Trotignon and Vuskovic we were able
to construct such an algorithm under the additional assumption that the
input graph is square-free (contains no induced four-cycle). More
recently, together with Lagoutte, Seymour and Spirkl, we solved another
case of the problem, when the clique number of the input graph is fixed
(and not part of the input).


Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted January 22, 2016
Last modified March 17, 2016

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm DMC Theatre

Maria Chudnovsky, Princeton University MacArthur Foundation Fellowship recipient 2012.
Induced cycles and coloring

The Strong Perfect Graph Theorem states that graphs with no no induced odd cycle of length at least five, and no complements of one behave very well with respect to coloring. But what happens if only some induced cycles (and no complements) are excluded? Gyarfas made a number of conjectures on this topic, asserting that in many cases the chromatic number is bounded by a function of the clique number. In this talk we discuss recent progress on some of these conjectures. This is joint work with Alex Scott and Paul Seymour.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted December 12, 2016
Last modified February 3, 2017

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm 130 Howe-Russell

Ken Ono, Emory University
Gems of Ramanujan and their Lasting Impact on Mathematics

Abstract: Ramanujan's work has has a truly transformative effect on modern mathematics, and continues to do so as we understand further lines from his letters and notebooks. In this lecture, some of the studies of Ramanujan that are most accessible to the general public will be presented and how Ramanujan's findings fundamentally changed modern mathematics, and also influenced the lecturer's work, will be discussed. The speaker is an Associate Producer of the film The Man Who Knew Infinity (starring Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons) about Ramanujan. He will share several clips from the film in the lecture.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted December 12, 2016
Last modified February 3, 2017

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm Dodson Auditorium

Ken Ono, Emory University
Cool Theorems Proved by Undergraduates

Abstract. The speaker has been organizing summer research programs for undergraduate students for many years. This lecture will give a sample of their accomplishments. The speaker will talk about partitioning integers, prime numbers, number fields, and generalizations of classical theorems of Euler, Gauss, and Jacobi.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted December 12, 2016
Last modified February 4, 2017

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm Dodson Auditorium

Ken Ono, Emory University
Can't you just feel the Moonshine?

Borcherds won the Fields medal in 1998 for his proof of the Monstrous Moonshine Conjecture. Loosely speaking, the conjecture asserts that the representation theory of the Monster, the largest sporadic finite simple group, is dictated by the Fourier expansions of a distinguished set of modular functions. This conjecture arose from astonishing coincidences noticed by finite group theorists and arithmetic geometers in the 1970s. Recently, mathematical physicists have revisited moonshine, and they discovered evidence of undiscovered moonshine which some believe will have applications to string theory and 3d quantum gravity. The speaker and his collaborators have been developing the mathematical facets of this theory, and have proved the conjectures which have been formulated. These results include a proof of the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture, and Moonshine for the first sporadic finite simple group which does not occur as a subgroup or subquotient of the Monster. The most recent Moonshine (announced here) yields unexpected applications to the arithmetic elliptic curves thanks to theorems related to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture and the Main Conjectures of Iwasawa theory for modular forms. This is joint work with John Duncan, Michael Griffin and Michael Mertens.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted November 7, 2017

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm tba

Irene Fonseca, Carnegie Mellon University
Porcelli Lecture 1

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted November 7, 2017

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm tba

Irene Fonseca, Carnegie Mellon University
Porcelli Lecture 2


Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted November 7, 2017

4:10 pm - 5:00 pm tba

Irene Fonseca, Carnegie Mellon University
Porcelli Lecture 3