LSU College of Science
LSU
Mathematics

Calendar


Time interval:   Events:

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 8, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Hongchao Zhang, University of Minnesota Candidate for Assistant Professor Position
TBA

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/307

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 10, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Johnny Guzman, University of Minnesota Candidate for Assistant Professor Postion
TBA

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/308

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Clayton Webster, Sandia National Laboratories Candidate for Assistant Professor Position
A Dimension-Adpative Sparse Grid Stochastic Collocation Technique for Partial Differential Equations with High-Dimensional Random Input Data

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/313

Thursday, January 24, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Jianlin Xia, University of CA at Los Angeles Candidate for Assistant Professor Position
Superfast Solvers For Some Large Structured Matrix Problems

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/311

Tuesday, January 29, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 24, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Wei Zhu, New York University Candidate for Assistant Professor Position
Modeling And Simulation Of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/315

Thursday, January 31, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted December 18, 2007
Last modified January 21, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Johnston 338

Xiaoliang Wan Candidate for Assistant Professor Position
Polynomial Chaos And Uncertainty Quantification

http://www.cct.lsu.edu/events/talks/312

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted January 30, 2008

1:40 pm - 2:30 pm Lockett 16

Pallavi Dani, Department of Mathematics, LSU
Filling invariants for groups

Abstract: For any loop in a simply-connected Riemannian manifold, one can look for a disk of minimal area whose boundary is that loop. More generally, one can consider fillings of $n$-spheres by $(n+1)$-balls. These notions have natural analogues in the realm of finitely presented groups, where one models the group using suitably defined geometric spaces. I will discuss Dehn functions of groups, which capture the difficulty of filling spheres with balls. A fundamental question in the area is that of determining which functions arise as Dehn functions of groups. I will give an overview of known results and describe recent progress in the $2$-dimensional case. This is joint work with Josh Barnard and Noel Brady.

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted March 25, 2008

3:30 pm 338 Johnston Hall

Claes Eskilsson, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Visiting Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University
"Modeling of Shallow Water Flows: Applications of DG Methods"

Abstract: There are many examples of water flows where the characteristic length scale is large compared to the vertical scale. The resulting depth-integrated shallow water equations (SWE) is a model equation of great importance since it is used in hydraulic and coastal engineering to model river flooding as well as storm surges and tsunamis.

Friday, September 19, 2008

Special Lecture  

Posted September 15, 2008

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Lockett 285

Service-Learning: What it is and why we do it

This is a talk/discussion about service-learning around the world, across campus, and in the department. Led by D. Kopcso, S. Kurtz and R. Perlis.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Special Lecture  

Posted February 24, 2010

3:40 pm - 4:30 pm Lockett 285

Mark Watkins, University of Sydney
A quick tour of Magma features

Abstract:
We give a quick tour of some features of the Magma computer algebra system.
These will include: modular forms, algebraic geometry (sheaf cohomology and
Groebner bases), computing with L-functions, machinery for function fields,
lattices, and some group/representation theory. No experience with Magma
will be assumed.

There will be coffee and cookies in the lounge at 3:00.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Special Lecture  

Posted March 25, 2014

10:30 am - 11:30 am Lockett 276

Arkady Berenstein, University of Oregon
Quantum cluster characters of Hall algebras

The goal of my talk (based on a recent joint paper with Dylan Rupel) is to introduce a generalized quantum cluster character, which assigns to each object V of a finitary Abelian category C over a finite field F_q and any sequence ii of simple objects in C an element X_{V,ii} of the corresponding algebra P_ii of q-polynomials. If C is hereditary, then the assignment V--> X_{V,ii} is an algebra homomorphism from the Hall-Ringel algebra of C to the q-polynomial algebra P_ii, which generalizes the well-known Feigin homomorphisms from the upper half of a quantum group to various q-polynomial algebras.

If C is the representation category of an acyclic quiver Q and ii is the twice repetition-free source-adapted sequence for Q, then we construct an acyclic quantum cluster algebra on P_ii and prove that the quantum cluster characters X_{V,ii} for exceptional representations Q give all (non-initial) cluster variables in P_ii. This, in particular, settles an important case of a conjecture by A. Zelevinsky and myself on quantum unipotent cells.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Special Lecture  

Posted April 15, 2016

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm TBA

Ben Schweizer, Technische Universität Dortmund
Resonance phenomena of small objects and the construction of meta-materials with astonishing properties

We know resonance effects from daily life: In a classical instrument, vibrations of some part of the instrument are amplified by resonance in the sound body. Typically, the resonator has a size that is related to the frequency: the larger the instrument, the lower the tone. In this talk we discuss resonators for light and sound waves that are small in size, much smaller than the wave-length. The assembly of many small resonators can act as a meta-material with astonishing properties: As a sound absorber or as a material with negative index. Our first example are small Helmholtz resonators, we investigate their frequency and the behavior of the corresponding meta-material. The second example are split-ring resonators for Maxwell's equations and the negative refraction of light. We conclude with some comments on negative index cloaks: These resonators lead to the invisibility of small objects in their vicinity.