LSU College of Science
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Mathematics

Calendar


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Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted November 3, 2018
Last modified February 22, 2019

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm 232 Lockett

Nicolas Andruskiewitsch, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (National University of Cordoba)
The classification of Hopf algebras with finite Gelfand-Kirillov dimension

The classification of Hopf algebras with finite Gelfand-Kirillov dimension has received attention recently. Nichols algebras play an important role in this question that will be explained in the talk together with an overview of examples and partial results.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019
Last modified February 21, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Yu-Chan Chang, Louisiana State University
Introduction to handlebody groups

Abstract: Handlebody group is the mapping class group of a 3-dimensional handlebody, it is a subgroup of the mapping class group of the boundary surface of that handlebody. In this introductory talk, I will talk about some properties of handlebody groups and how different they are from the surface mapping groups.

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Colloquium  Questions or comments?

Posted October 18, 2018
Last modified February 17, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm Lockett 232

Matthew Hedden, Michigan State University
Knot theory and algebraic curves

Abstract: The modern study of knots and links has important roots in the theory of algebraic curves, where links encode subtle features of singularities. This thread was taken in interesting new directions in the 20th century, and the interaction between links in 3-dimensional manifolds and algebraic curves in complex surfaces continues to be a rich and beautiful area. In this talk I will survey the subject, from its seeds in the work of Newton to interesting advances which have occurred in the past decade.

Friday, March 1, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted December 27, 2018
Last modified February 22, 2019

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm 232 Lockett

Eric Rowell, Texas A&M
Representations of Mapping Class Groups and Motion Groups

(2+1)TQFTs and their algebraic counterparts (modular categories) provide finite dimensional representations
of mapping class groups, such as the braid group and SL(2,Z). Analogously, one expects to (3+1)TQFTs to
give us representations of motion groups, such as the loop braid group--the motions of the n-component unlink.
I will describe a few questions related to these representations, some of which are motivated by topological quantum
computation, and what is currently known about their answers.

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted December 11, 2018

Mardi Gras Holiday

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted October 1, 2018
Last modified October 26, 2018

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm 232 Lockett Originally scheduled for Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Luca Candelori, Wayne State University
Transcendence of Periods and Endomorphism Algebras of Jacobian Varieties

In this talk I will describe a new method to bound the number of linear relations with algebraic coefficients between the periods of an algebraic curve. As shown by Shiga and Wolfart, these bounds provide information regarding the dimension of the endomorphism algebra of the corresponding Jacobian variety. I will explain how to employ these new bounds to explore two of the many open questions about endomorphism algebras of Jacobians: which Jacobians have complex multiplication, and which Jacobians are totally decomposable.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Federico Salmoiraghi, Department of Mathematics, LSU
TBA


Geometry and Topology Seminar  Seminar website

Posted October 22, 2018
Last modified January 9, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Lockett 233

Caitlin Leverson, Georgia Institute of Technology
TBA

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted December 17, 2018

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm

Timo Richarz, Technische Universitat Darmstadt
TBA


Computational Mathematics Seminar  

Posted February 14, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm 1034 Digital Media Center

Hongbo Dong, Washington State University
TBA

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Nurdin Takenov, Louisiana State University
TBA

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Colloquium  Questions or comments?

Posted January 9, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm TBD

Amarjit Budhiraja, UNC Chapel Hill
TBD

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 1:30 pm Lockett 233

Rima Chatterjee, Louisiana State University
TBA


Geometry and Topology Seminar  Seminar website

Posted August 15, 2018

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Lockett 233

Tye Lidman, North Carolina State University
TBA

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted September 30, 2018
Last modified February 10, 2019

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Nicholson Hall 130

Robert Bryant, Duke University Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2002), Member, National Academy of Sciences (2007), AMS Fellow (2013), AMS President (2015-2017)
Porcelli Lecture 1 (High-School Level): Mathematical Mysteries of the Ellipse

Abstract: After lines and circles, the simplest curves are the so-called conic sections, hyperbolas, parabolas, and ellipses. Not only are they the next simplest curves, but they have many applications in the physical world and have been studied for more than two thousand years.
However, these curves have many surprising properties that were not discovered until fairly recently.
For example, it has been known for a long time that light emitted from one focus of an ellipse collects at the other focus, and a similar property for the parabola is used in designing headlights. However, this turns out to be a special case of a much more interesting and surprising special property discovered in the 19th century and that has given rise to problems that we still don't know how to solve today.
In this talk, which will use nothing beyond high school algebra (and lots of pictures), I'll explain some of these mysteries and why we study them.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted September 30, 2018
Last modified February 10, 2019

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Howe-Russell 130

Robert Bryant, Duke University Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2002), Member, National Academy of Sciences (2007), AMS Fellow (2013), AMS President (2015-2017)
Porcelli Lecture 2 (Undergraduate Level): Geometry Old and New: From Euclid to String Theory

Abstract: Classical geometry is based on notions of symmetry and congruence, and these ideas, while very old, have deeply influenced our understanding of the physical world. The idea of modeling the world through principles of least action or least energy are tied to symmetry in deep ways. In this talk, I will survey the history of how this relationship was uncovered by mathematicians such as Euler, Gauss, Lie, and Noether and is still developing in our modern understanding of the world, from Einstein's theory of relativity even to contemporary versions of string theory.


Pasquale Porcelli Lecture Series  Special Lecture Series

Posted September 30, 2018
Last modified February 10, 2019

4:10 pm - 5:00 pm Howe-Russell 130

Robert Bryant, Duke University Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2002), Member, National Academy of Sciences (2007), AMS Fellow (2013), AMS President (2015-2017)
Porcelli Lecture 3 (Graduate Student Level): The Best Possible Shapes of Surfaces

Abstract: Much of classical mathematics involves finding a configuration or shape that provides an optimum solution of a problem. For example, it has long been known (though a rigorous proof took quite a while to find) that the surface of least area enclosing a given volume is a round sphere. There are many other ways to measure surfaces, though, and finding 'the' surface that optimizes a given 'measurement' (subject to some given constraints) remains a challenging problem that has motivated some of the deepest recent work in the mathematics of geometric shapes.

In this talk, I will explain some of the classic ways to measure shapes of surfaces and relate this to classical problems involving surface area (soap films and bubbles) and total curvature as well to as recent progress by myself and others on these important optimization problems.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Lucas Meyers, Louisiana State University
TBA

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted August 20, 2018
Last modified December 18, 2018

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm Originally scheduled for Wednesday, December 31, 1969

Sharon Frechette, College of the Holy Cross
TBA


Computational Mathematics Seminar  

Posted February 14, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm 1034 Digital Media Center

Winnifried Wollner, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt
TBA

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Sean Bibby, Louisiana State University
TBA


Geometry and Topology Seminar  Seminar website

Posted January 25, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Lockett 233

Peter Lambert-Cole, Georgia Institute of Technology
TBA

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted December 11, 2018

Spring Break

Monday, April 22, 2019

Algebra and Number Theory Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted February 12, 2019

3:10 pm - 4:00 pm

Peter Jorgensen, Newcastle University
TBA

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Informal Geometry and Topology Seminar  Questions or comments?

Posted January 27, 2019

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Lockett 233

Natthawut Phanachet, Louisiana State University
TBA

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Colloquium  Questions or comments?

Posted January 17, 2019

3:30 pm - 4:20 pm TBD

Jasson Vindas, Ghent University, Belgium
TBD